Va. and Md. Election 2015
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Va. and Md. Election 2015

Voters throughout Virginia and in some Maryland cities headed to the polls Nov. 3. Here is a recap of voters' choices for county or city officials along with Virginia senators and delegates.

WASHINGTON Election night in Virginia brought no major surprises and kept the state Senate and House of Delegates in the hands of Republican lawmakers. But several minority candidates made history in local races. 

Two of the most-watched General Assembly races in the region were won by Democratic candidates but the wins did nothing to give Gov. Terry McAuliffe the extra seats he was hoping for in the Virginia Senate.

The result means that McAuliffe will have little chance of expanding Medicaid to cover more of Virginia's poor or enacting tougher gun laws during his final two years in office. 

Democrat Jeremy McPike won 54 percent of the vote to beat Manassas Mayor Hal Parrish in the 29th Senate District race, according to unofficial election results. The district covers portions of Prince William County, Manassas and Manassas Park. McPike will replace Democrat Chuck Colgan, who is retiring after a long career in the Senate. 

Gun legislation figured heavily in the race. Michael Bloomberg's gun control group spent an estimated $2.1 million trying to help Democrats in two key Senate race including McPike, based on an analysis by The Center for Public Integrity.

The Associated Press reported that McPike outspent Parrish $888,000 to $437,000.

But a proposal to add tolls on Interstate 66 inside the Capital Beltway also became a major issue in the race and McAuliffe tried to drum up support for Democrat candidates in hopes of securing support for his administration's toll plan. Republicans have loudly criticized the scheme for failing to add capacity to a heavily traveled road that taxpayers have already paid for. And GOP leaders have vowed to ax the plan when the legislature convenes in January. 

In a neighboring district, incumbent Sen. Jennifer Wexton, D-Leesburg, held off challenger Stephen Hollingshead, who campaigned against the toll plan. The 33rd Senate District stretches from Leesburg to Herndon. 

In Western Fairfax, Democrat Jennifer Boysko beat Republican Danny Vargas, who also campaigned against the tolls, earning 54 percent of votes in the 86th House District. Vargas won 40 percent of votes case and Independent Paul Brubaker won 5 percent, according to unofficial election results.   

Boysko narrowly lost to retiring Del. Tom Rust two years ago. 

The House of Delegates stayed firmly under the control of Republicans but Democrats managed to pick up one additional seat. There was no change in the number of Senate seats held by Democrats and Republicans. 

Local races 

Alexandria Mayor-elect Allison Silberberg talks on the phone during her election night celebration in Del Ray on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) 

Loudoun County voters made historic changes to its Board of Supervisors, ousting its chair and adding black supervisors for the first time in the county's history.   

Phyllis Randall will become the first black woman to hold the post of board chair. She beat incumbent Scott York and two other candidates to earn the county's top seat. She has not previously served on the board. 

“Ethics and transparency, the importance of education ... full day kindergarten for our students, those types of issues resonated with the people of Loudoun," she said.  

Voters also ousted long-serving and controversial Supervisor Eugene Delgaudio. Koran Saines will instead serve the Sterling District and he will join Randall as the first black supervisors ever to serve on the board.

In College Park, voters chose Patrick Wojahn to be the city's next mayor. Wojahn earned 1,236 votes and Denise Mitchell earned 846 votes, according to unofficial election results. 

He'll be the first openly gay man to hold the job. 

Alexandria will also have a new mayor. Vice Mayor Allison Silberberg held off a write-in campaign by four-term Mayor Bill Euille to take the city’s top office. 

Euille decided to run as a write-in candidate after he was defeated by Silberberg in the Democratic primary over the summer. Tuesday night she won 63 percent of the vote and 37 percent of the ballots included a write-in candidate for mayor, which may or may not have been cast for Euille. 

"I’m deeply honored that the citizens of Alexandria have spoken overwhelmingly," Silberberg said at an election night party at a Mexican-American restaurant in Del Ray.  

“It will be a new day in Alexandria. This is a change election. The citizens of Alexandria have voted for me, they believe in, I think, historic preservation. It’s a core value of our city and it should be a core value in our leadership.”  

The pace and type of development in the city was a major issue in the city's primary. 

And on the Fairfax County School Board, two incumbents will not return after losing to challengers. 

Incumbent Patricia Reed won 41.5 percent of the vote to challenger Dalia Palchik's 58 percent in the Providence District. And At-Large member Ted Velkoff came in fourth place out of a field of nine candidates, according to unofficial election results. 


WTOP's Amanda Iacone, Max Smith and Dick Uliano contributed to this report. 

Correction: This story has been corrected to reflect that two incumbents, not three as previously reported, lost their re-election bids for Fairfax County School Board. Board member Jane Strauss won her re-election bid. 

  • Four-term Alexandria Mayor Bill Euille hugs a supporter on election night Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015. Euille was defeated by Vice Mayor Allison Silberber for the city's top post. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) 
    Twice the feat 

    Four terms of Bill Euille was enough for Alexandria's voters, who for the second time in six months opted for Allison Silberberg to be the city's next mayor. 

    The vice mayor held off a write-in challenge by Euille to take the city's top office with 63 percent of the vote. Thirty-seven percent of the ballots included a write-in candidate for mayor, which may or may not have been cast for Euille, according unofficial election results. 

     Euille decided to run as a write-in candidate after he was defeated by Silberberg in the Democratic primary over the summer. 

    "I’m deeply honored that the citizens of Alexandria have spoken overwhelmingly," Silberberg said at an election night party at a Mexican-American restaurant in Del Ray.  

    “It will be a new day in Alexandria. This is a change election. The citizens of Alexandria have voted for me, they believe in, I think, historic preservation. It’s a core value of our city and it should be a core value in our leadership.”  

    The pace and type of development in the city was a major issue in the city's primary and again in the general election.

    “I kept saying it’s time for change; that we should restore the people’s trust and that we should pursue thoughtful, appropriate development that fits in and is to scale and protect our neighborhood’s quality of life and we should preserve and protect the historic districts of our city," Silberberg said.

    Euille said he knew mounting a successful write-in campaign would be difficult. But he doesn't regret making it a competitive race for voters. 

    "Alexandria will be better off for continuing to have a strong Democratic government," he said.  “I’ll continue to reside in the city, live here, work here, play here, have fun and make sure that Alexandria continues to be the best city in America.


    WTOP's Dick Uliano contributed to this report from Alexandria. 

  • A meteoric shift for Loudoun County 

    Loudoun County's new Board of Supervisors chair says that voters in the rapidly growing community are ready for a new outlook and agenda by local officials. 

    Hammering home the point that the county's residents want new leadership, voters selected five new members including the first two black supervisors to ever serve in the county's history.

    “I do think it’s a big shift. I think people were ready for a change.  I think there were some things that they saw that were disturbing, and I think that Loudoun County is no longer kind of a bed and breakfast for Fairfax County. We are a dynamic and a growing county in and of ourselves, and I think people are ready to move into a new time and a new moment," said Phyllis Randall from her election night celebration in Sterling. 

    Randall ousted board Chair Scott York and beat two other candidates to take the county's top leadership post. She'll be joined by four other new members of the board including Koran Saines who won his own upset election against controversial Supervisor Eugene Delgaudio. 

    “Ethics and transparency, the importance of education…full day kindergarten for our students, those types of issues resonated with the people of Loudoun," Randall said.

    She also promised a government that is more open, transparent and that holds itself accountable.

    “The first thing we will do is put forth a code of ethical behavior, that will be the first motion I make," she said.

    WTOP's Max Smith contributed to this report. 

     

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